Untitled

poptarts:

theunderrated:

stereoactivenyc:

soupsoup:

brilliantlydifferent:

taken from Pitchfork.
The internet must be impossible to police, but surely there is a better solution coming, eh Google? I love your products, I use at least 15 of them, but there are good blogs and bad blogs - the good ones usually post material / music that has already been cleared by repertoire owners / management and band - and then there are the other blogs posting entire albums or uncleared music.
It’s VITAL to understand the distinction, blogs as mentioned in the Pitchfork post are by and large very decent blogs and unfairly taking the brunt of many other blogger leakers.
2 more years and Tumblr will be going through the same events, or will it we?




Considering I have seen the wrath of Google first hand I think I should chime in at this point. What Google did was unfair and unjust. In their DMCA take down letters they never inform you what the infringing mp3’s are, forcing the writer to take down ALL the mp3’s in the offending post whether they have the permission to post them or not.
Now I know I am not entirely innocent in this, I have knowingly published mp3’s that were not approved for posting but in doing so my intentions were always to shine the best possible light on the music I covered giving it the publicity it deserved. In this day and age with thousands upon thousands of like minded individuals doing the same it is a truly blurred line of what is right and wrong.
A few years back I posted the entirety of Thom Yorke’s The Eraser and suffered the consequences of my improper actions. I knew it was wrong but was seeking to improve my standing in the blog world and acted hastily in doing so. The post was taken down pretty quickly and I will never post a full album again, but there are countless sites doing just this and getting away with it. Instead of going after these culprits Blogger and Google have gone after true music fans who just want to share what they are enjoying with the reader’s of their sites. That seems unfair and unjustified in my mind.
At this point Blogger has responded to all the take downs that have hit in the last two days taking absolutely no blame for their part and basically saying they did everything right. If they had just included what the offending mp3’s were they could have avoided all of these headaches and bad press and we could have kept on going like any other day. Instead, as people have been forced indoors the past two days, the story has blown up into a huge black eye for a company that I genuinely trust and use on a daily basis.
I’m hoping Blogger allows me to recover the posts of my past 5-years in the way I’d like to, but I doubt anything like that is going to happen. Instead I did the best I could to copy and past the material to my new Wordpress hosted site, poptartssucktoasted.com, and I will resume new posts there shortly. Before I do I’d like to say to all the record companies out there that think I’m a villain for what I do, you are 100% wrong! The people that create and write and update these sites with fervent passion are your biggest customers! We are the ones that buy the $100 box set of material released 10-years ago. We are the ones that collect the 7”s, attend the music festivals, and buy the t-shirts. We LOVE MUSIC and we LOVE Bands and no matter how you think you’re helping your industry by sending the Web Sheriff or DMCA notices you are most certainly not helping. Instead you are looking like the dinosaur of an industry that you are, unable to adapt to the changing business model and falling apart at the seams as you try and fight little people that love what you do! It’s time for you guys to look internally at your own policies and see what you can do better, rather than attack your biggest customers who are just trying to spread the word of the music they love!
Thanks to everyone who has supported me, offered a hand, or culled older blogs in the last two days! It’s because of your out pouring of appreciation that I won’t wash my hands of this whole music business, and will continue on reinforced in the thought that I am doing something that people appreciate and that what we as music bloggers do is vital to the continued existence of the music we love.(via oohbrilliant)

poptarts:

theunderrated:

stereoactivenyc:

soupsoup:

brilliantlydifferent:

taken from Pitchfork.

The internet must be impossible to police, but surely there is a better solution coming, eh Google? I love your products, I use at least 15 of them, but there are good blogs and bad blogs - the good ones usually post material / music that has already been cleared by repertoire owners / management and band - and then there are the other blogs posting entire albums or uncleared music.

It’s VITAL to understand the distinction, blogs as mentioned in the Pitchfork post are by and large very decent blogs and unfairly taking the brunt of many other blogger leakers.

2 more years and Tumblr will be going through the same events, or will it we?

Considering I have seen the wrath of Google first hand I think I should chime in at this point. What Google did was unfair and unjust. In their DMCA take down letters they never inform you what the infringing mp3’s are, forcing the writer to take down ALL the mp3’s in the offending post whether they have the permission to post them or not.

Now I know I am not entirely innocent in this, I have knowingly published mp3’s that were not approved for posting but in doing so my intentions were always to shine the best possible light on the music I covered giving it the publicity it deserved. In this day and age with thousands upon thousands of like minded individuals doing the same it is a truly blurred line of what is right and wrong.

A few years back I posted the entirety of Thom Yorke’s The Eraser and suffered the consequences of my improper actions. I knew it was wrong but was seeking to improve my standing in the blog world and acted hastily in doing so. The post was taken down pretty quickly and I will never post a full album again, but there are countless sites doing just this and getting away with it. Instead of going after these culprits Blogger and Google have gone after true music fans who just want to share what they are enjoying with the reader’s of their sites. That seems unfair and unjustified in my mind.

At this point Blogger has responded to all the take downs that have hit in the last two days taking absolutely no blame for their part and basically saying they did everything right. If they had just included what the offending mp3’s were they could have avoided all of these headaches and bad press and we could have kept on going like any other day. Instead, as people have been forced indoors the past two days, the story has blown up into a huge black eye for a company that I genuinely trust and use on a daily basis.

I’m hoping Blogger allows me to recover the posts of my past 5-years in the way I’d like to, but I doubt anything like that is going to happen. Instead I did the best I could to copy and past the material to my new Wordpress hosted site, poptartssucktoasted.com, and I will resume new posts there shortly. Before I do I’d like to say to all the record companies out there that think I’m a villain for what I do, you are 100% wrong! The people that create and write and update these sites with fervent passion are your biggest customers! We are the ones that buy the $100 box set of material released 10-years ago. We are the ones that collect the 7”s, attend the music festivals, and buy the t-shirts. We LOVE MUSIC and we LOVE Bands and no matter how you think you’re helping your industry by sending the Web Sheriff or DMCA notices you are most certainly not helping. Instead you are looking like the dinosaur of an industry that you are, unable to adapt to the changing business model and falling apart at the seams as you try and fight little people that love what you do! It’s time for you guys to look internally at your own policies and see what you can do better, rather than attack your biggest customers who are just trying to spread the word of the music they love!

Thanks to everyone who has supported me, offered a hand, or culled older blogs in the last two days! It’s because of your out pouring of appreciation that I won’t wash my hands of this whole music business, and will continue on reinforced in the thought that I am doing something that people appreciate and that what we as music bloggers do is vital to the continued existence of the music we love.

(via oohbrilliant)

Lost in Translation: The 50 Americanisms That Annoy Brits Most

motherjones:

vanityfair:

nightline:

As collected by the BBC:

14. I caught myself saying “shopping cart” instead of shopping trolley today and was thoroughly disgusted with myself. I’ve never lived nor been to the US either.

23. To put a list into alphabetical order is to “alphabetize it” - horrid!

36. Surely the most irritating is: “You do the Math.” Math? It’s MATHS.

#50 FTW.

[Angrily composing spirited, 700-word defense of the word “fanny pack”]

Pixel Politics: Pixel Politics is BACK!

pixelpolitics:

…with a surprise!

Do your Wednesdays feel joyless and empty now Parliament’s in its summer recess? Does 12 o’clock pass without event, leaving you deflated and depressed?

Prime Minister’s Questions is every political nut’s favourite time of the week and we all deserve to enjoy it whenever we…

staff:

A closer look at one of Matthew Buchanan’s featured themes: Solaris

One of two new premium themes from Matthew Buchanan, Solaris implements nearly every Tumblr feature imaginable. Custom header graphics, author credit for group blogs, recent tweets, Disqus comments, custom colors, and shared Likes, are all painless to set up.

He’s also added a crazy trick where you can completely invert the colors (from light to dark) with just a click!

I’m inspired to bring a little of the craftsmanship of print typography to the web. I’m also enamored of the minimal, graphic works of illustrators Frank Chimero, Olly Moss and Stefan Dziallas, and wanted to bring some of that style to the largely content-focused layout.

— Matthew Buchanan

Solaris is available for just $9 in the Theme Garden.  Check out the demo.

Thanks, Matt!

Nobody tells this to people who are beginners, I wish someone told me. All of us who do creative work, we get into it because we have good taste. But there is this gap. For the first couple years you make stuff, it’s just not that good. It’s trying to be good, it has potential, but it’s not. But your taste, the thing that got you into the game, is still killer. And your taste is why your work disappoints you. A lot of people never get past this phase, they quit. Most people I know who do interesting, creative work went through years of this. We know our work doesn’t have this special thing that we want it to have. We all go through this. And if you are just starting out or you are still in this phase, you gotta know its normal and the most important thing you can do is do a lot of work. Put yourself on a deadline so that every week you will finish one story. It is only by going through a volume of work that you will close that gap, and your work will be as good as your ambitions. And I took longer to figure out how to do this than anyone I’ve ever met. It’s gonna take awhile. It’s normal to take awhile. You’ve just gotta fight your way through.

—Ira Glass (via nefffy)

(via nprfreshair)

nihongo:

Tumblr iPhone 2.0:App Storeからダウンロード可能です

これには私たちもワクワクしています!どうしたらTumblrを快適に利用できるかを原点に帰って考え直し、コーディングの再実行、再構築を行いました。

  • 新しいインターフェイス:ダッシュボードのブラウジング、投稿の作成、複数ブログの管理など、Tumblrの重要な機能のほとんどに、出先からでも簡単にアクセスできます。
  • 投稿の作成:これ以上ないくらい簡単になりました!画像や動画、リンク、会話、テキスト、引用、音声の引用が中心に位置されています。下書きの保存や予約投稿などは一回のスワイプで実行可能です。
  • メッセージ:ブログに届いたメッセージの閲覧・返信ができます。
  • 連絡作:電話の連絡先に登録された人から、フォローできるユーザーを探せます。
  • 新しいユーザー:サインアップがアプリ内で行えます。

他にも注目な機能はたくさんあります。

App Storeから、是非チェックしてみてください!

(Source: staff)

svpply:

These are our Facebook demographic stats. It’s a gender distribution we’re proud of, given how heavily online shopping typically skews towards women, and how much effort we’ve put into making sure Svpply is a site that men feel comfortable using.

svpply:

These are our Facebook demographic stats. It’s a gender distribution we’re proud of, given how heavily online shopping typically skews towards women, and how much effort we’ve put into making sure Svpply is a site that men feel comfortable using.

(via pieratt)